Creative Commons in the Classroom

The Internet can be a goldmine for offering students the chance to create, research, collaborate, and share their work. However, with this immense resource comes the opportunity for misunderstanding what is freely available, and what is not. Thankfully, there are a number of resources available to help you and your students to access Creative Commons media. The presentation below helps to introduce “What is Creative Commons”.


There are some very helpful resources available to assist you and your students in searching for freely available works. Many of these tools utilize the powerful network that Flickr has become, but instead of having to tediously search through Flickr’s site, these search engines can bring up only the works which apply to your needs. Some resources are:

Looking for music? ccMixter is a community music site featuring remixes licensed under Creative Commons where you can listen to, sample, mash-up, or interact with music in whatever way you want.”

And for freely available sounds, check out the Freesound Project

I borrowed the following information from Mr. Millette’s wonderful post on Creative Commons.

byAttribution: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give credit the way you request.

saShare alike: You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work.

ncNon-commercial: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for noncommercial purposes only.

ndNo derivative works: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it.

Look for those symbols when downloading images.  They will at least have the attribution, which means that you’ll need to make a citation of the image for all that are not your own creations.

Hopefully these resources prove helpful!