Exporting and Importing Your WordPress Blog

As the year winds down, many of you will be moving on to new adventures. Wouldn’t it be great to take all the hard work you’ve put into your blogs with you? Well, you can!

However, before moving onto the steps of how to export your current blog, you’ll need to head over to WordPress.com (assuming that’s your preferred platform) and create a new blog. WordPress has two types of blogs – those hosted by WordPress (which end in .com) and those that you must host yourself (which end in .org). Our ISM blogs are on paid hosting (.org), so unless you’d like to pay for your own blog hosting, you’ll need to create a WordPress.com blog.

Give some thought to your blog’s new web address. I recommend to use something that’s not tied to a particular locations, school or situation as these may change. Assuming you’ve already created the new blog, let’s move on.

It’s relatively simple and straightforward:

  1. Log in to your WordPress blog here at ISM.
  2. In your dashboard, on the left hand column, you’ll see “Tools”. Under that, click on “Export”.
  3. You’ll be presented with a few options. Where it says, “Choose What to Export”, click “All content” and “Download Export File”.
  4. That will then download a file to your computer. (an XML file)
  5. Ok now the export is done!
  6. Assuming you’ve logged into your new WordPress.com blog, follow a similar path (from the dashboard, left-hand side, “Tools”, “Import”.
  7. Select, “WordPress” from the list of options from which to import.
  8. On the next screen, “Choose File” and select the XML file that was exported from your old blog.
  9. Make sure you select, “Import Attachments” – that will then import all most of your media from your old blog to the new one.
  10. Once it’s done, visit your site to confirm that things look similar to your ISM blog. Of course it will appear differently depending upon which theme you’ve chosen. However, there are literally thousands of themes to be used with WordPress.

Maine School District Giving Every Kindergarten Student A Free iPad 2

A school district in Maine has been approved to offer a free iPad 2 to every Kindergarten student. Here’s the full story.

“This is truly redefining how we’re going to teach and learn. We’re talking about a new tool, the iPad2. You begin to watch how young people jump on, jump in and figure this thing out. It has great potential for leveling the playing field for all students.”

Some students start kindergarten behind others “and never catch up,” Morrill said. The iPad2 “can close that gap for many students. It can also accelerate learning for many others.”

When young children are given an iPad2, “they can make it sing. … It gives me great pleasure to roll this out,” Morrill said. Auburn can reach its goal of boosting literacy rates from 62 percent to 90 percent by 2013, “and this is the tool to do it.”

 

Dipity.com – Free Digital Timeline Site

Dipity.com – Free Digital Timelines

This has fantastic potential for subjects such as Social Studies, History, Music, Art, Science, etc. Thanks to Mrs. Dickinson for introducing this to us! Here are some fantastic examples from her students (view the comment section).

 

“Dipity is a free digital timeline website. Our mission is to organize the web’s content by date and time. Users can create, share, embed and collaborate on interactive, visually engaging timelines that integrate video, audio, images, text, links, social media, location and timestamps.”

“Dipity timelines are for anyone who uses the Internet. Newspapers, journalists, celebrities, government organizations, politicians, financial institutions, community managers, museums, universities, teachers, students, non-profits and bloggers all use Dipity to create timelines.”

Tools for the 21st Century Teacher Vol. 2

Are you looking for some new ways to integration technology into your curriculum?  If so, there are some great resources included in Tools for the 21st Century Teacher Vol. 2 by Matt Zimmer.  If you didn’t see the first volume, be sure to check that out as well!  You may also be interested in following Matt’s blog, The Pursuit of Technology Happiness.  I found some great resources in this blog.

Animation: First Steps

Some Grade 6 iDesign students created animations which were played for the entire Middle School this week. Based on the laughing. applause, and the audience’s desire for more, the student animators should be proud of their work.

If you are interested in animation, download the free Stykz program. It is available for both Windows and Mac. The website includes some great “getting started’ video tutorials. They also have great tips and a solid help section to learn as you go.


12 Ways to Use The Times to Develop Math Literacy

12 Ways to Use The Times to Develop Math Literacy

Here’s one example:

9. Understand Our World

How do economic factors like per-person G.D.P.unemployment and percentage of people living in poverty affect countries like Egypt and Libya? How do these countries compare to the United States in these categories?

Choose a country in the news and check out its vital statistics using The Times’s Countries and Territories index or the C.I.A. World Factbook. How do numbers like populationG.D.P.area and birthrate affect this country’s current position in the world? Find a country with similar vital statistics and compare them on the numbers. How are these countries similar? How are they different? What additional factors might explain the differences?

Or, take a deeper look at the numbers for the United States in our lesson about interpreting Census data.

How to Burn CDs with iTunes

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  • Create a new playlist in iTunes. Click the “Add Playlist” icon in the bottom-left corner of iTunes. This icon looks like a plus symbol.
  • Add songs from your iTunes library to your playlist. To do this, click the “Music” tab in the upper-left corner of iTunes. Drag the songs from the library onto the playlist tab in the left column of iTunes.
  • Click the “Burn Disc” button in the lower-right corner of iTunes. The files are burned onto an audio CD. (Make sure you’re burning an “audio CD” and not an “MP3 CD”.